Week #4 was all about sewing over 150 pieces of fabric together. But with Star Trek Voyager playing in the background me and Captain Janeway can get through anything together.

Chain piecing really came in handy with these little block buddies. It’s a sewing technique I learned from Suzy Quilts when I took her class on sewing Mojo Minis on Craftsy/Bluprint.

Here’s what that looks like:

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I have no idea why I was using my kitchen scissors over my fabric scissors but friends, life has been wild lately.

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Sewing all 30 squares together was a lot to get through, but after I was done I had the happiest little short stack of sweet home love.

Next, I sewed all the middle rectangles to make the five sashes. My husband graciously agreed to let me put 3,000 tiny holes (more like only 25) in our wall and helped me tack everything up so I could start laying out my blocks to make sure I have the pattern as balanced as possible. He even helped pick out which block should come next and then rearranged them afterwards to help me get the best look. I married a very kind man.

Have you ever made a design wall before? What did you do? Because I certainly can’t do this for every future project 🙂 I reached out to the Young & Millennial Quilters Facebook group and they all had wonderful ideas on how to create a design wall. I should invite them over to help my husband fill in my tack holes.

The one thing I’m a little concerned about is how short my log cabin blocks are compared to my bungalows. There’s consistently about a half inch difference between the two. I’ve thought about using a smaller seam allowance on the top of my bungalows as a way of getting them to line up properly, but that’s going to be a lot of switching back and forth between seam allowances each time and I’m probably going to forget. But we’ll see what happens. If I end up with a finished quilt top that’s remotely rectangle, I’ll take it!

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Follow my progress on Instagram at @QuiltingJewish

Related Posts:
• Sweet Home QAL Week #3: Bungalow Blocks
• Sweet Home QAL Week #2: Log Cabin Blocks
• My First Quilt-a-Long on Instagram: The Sweet Home Quilt

And yes, I have some wild fabric choices in this quilt. I’ve learned a lot through this experience and will make different choices next time while shopping for fabrics. I think one thing I’m going to try and do is slow down and really take my time laying out patterns and fabrics in Illustrator before I cut a single thing. I just got way too excited too quickly when I joined the #sweethomeqal on Instagram – but I’m SO glad I did.

I’m already brainstorming fabrics to make another Sweet Home Quilt for my dad. He recently renovated his basement to feel like the inside of a log cabin and it’s SO cool. One of my childhood houses was also a bungalow, so I think I can make a pretty neat American-themed Sweet Home Quilt tapestry to hang on the wall or across the back of the couch. I just need a thousand extra hours of time.

Sweet Home Quilt
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Sharon Holland’s Sweet Home Quilt is my first time following a quilt pattern and I can’t be more proud of myself for figuring it all out. I’ve made some mistakes along the way, but an expert in anything was once a beginner.

Keep sewing forward.

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